Evaluation for Results-Oriented Management – What Can Development Stakeholders Learn from the Michelin Guide?

What would it take to create a Guide Michelin-like experience in development?

At its heart, the Guide Michelin represents an evaluation system par excellence. For evaluators, it requires that we ensure our evaluations close an information gap, provide a credible source of information, and are timely. Equally important, there needs to be openness and receptivity among our clients – leaders, policy-makers, and development practitioners – to accept that things are not “just perfect”. They can and must improve. In this process, evaluation needs to and does step back, take a different perspective to help our those at the forefront of delivering policy change and programs to gain insights they would not have given their day-to-day pressures.

It is in sharing the goal of delivering the best possible results for client countries and the people affected by interventions where development practitioners and evaluators should find common ground.

And it is for this goals that it is essential that there is a culture and a system to pay attention, observe, track and record progress, fix problems as they arise, and step back at the end and reflect on what we have created. And all of that to understand whether the human endeavor, the development of humanity is progressing towards goals set for 2030, and what role our deliberate efforts are playing in that process.

View Caroline Heider’s complete post here:

Source: Evaluation for Results-Oriented Management – What Can Development Stakeholders Learn from the Michelin Guide? | Independent Evaluation Group

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